The Body/Tooth Connection

Ongoing research is proving that oral health has an impact on your overall general health. For instance, there are studies showing that gum disease has been linked to health problems such as diabetes, heart disease, stroke, premature births, and other conditions.

Essentially, poor oral health translates to germs and toxins that, when unchecked and left to roam your system, can inflict serious damage and cause body-wide inflammation. Your mouth, as the gateway to your body, is constantly being infiltrated by these invaders – all of which can seep into your bloodstream, cells, tissues, and organs. Your mouth is not a closed system!

Not only is your mouth under assault from germs and toxins, common dental procedures like root canals can cause deadly bacteria to enter the body, multiply, and cause infection unless dentists take certain precautions. Even materials used in dental procedures such as mercury or fluoride can be toxic to your body.

Additionally, Holistic Dentistry (sometimes called Biological or Alternative Dentistry,) recognizes that each individual tooth in the mouth correlates to a specific organ or body part. Holistic dentistry integrates modern science with the meridian system utilized in Chinese Medicine, and the Qi (pronounced “tchee”). In a living organism, Qi is the energy that circulates within the body through meridians that intersect all parts of the body. For instance, in acupuncture, needles are inserted into specific points on a meridian system that also corresponds to every organ and body part.

Your teeth are key points on the meridians, both energetically and physically. If there is currently a problem with a specific tooth or if there have been problems in the past, that tooth is directly connected to another place in the body, such as the heart, the kidney, the breast, the prostate, the neck, etc.

The body has five meridians, and each tooth corresponds to one of the meridians and a separate part of the body. To further explore the Tooth Meridian chart, click here. Click on the individual teeth to learn about its relationship to the rest of your body.

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Good Oral Health is the “Gateway” to Overall Good Health

If your mouth is healthy, there is a high probability your overall health is good, too. On the other hand, if you have poor dental health, it may be an indication of other health problems, such as the following:

  • Bad breath and bleeding gums can be an indication of diabetes;
  • Dental x-rays may show the first stages of bone loss, arthritis, and/or osteoporosis;
  • Open lesions or other signs of oral and dental infections can be an indication of heart disease or HIV.

Research shows that more than 90 percent of all systemic diseases have oral manifestations such as swollen gums, dry mouth, swollen gums or other gum problems. These diseases include some of the following:

  • Diabetes
  • Leukemia
  • Oral cancer
  • Pancreatic cancer
  • Heart disease
  • Kidney disease

However, the reverse is true as well; hidden issues in your mouth can cause health problems in the rest of your body as well.  Dental problems can contribute to overall health issues in many ways:

  • Infections in the gums and/or jawbone: toxins can leak out from these infections and may affect your immune system, leading to disease.
  • The relationship between specific teeth and illness: when a tooth becomes infected or diseased, the organ on the same acupuncture meridian can also become unhealthy.
  • Root canals can be a source of disease. Root canals are dead organs left in your mouth.  Toxins can seep out of the root canal teeth and can cause systemic diseases of the heart, kidney, uterus, and the nervous and endocrine systems.
  • Toxicity of dental materials used: dental materials can release mercury, tin, copper, silver, nickel and zinc into the body, which can then migrate from the tooth into the bones, connective tissues and nerves. From there, they can travel to the central nervous system, where they can permanently disrupt the body’s normal functions.
  • Galvanic charges from the metals in your mouth: saliva in the mouth acts as a conduit in which dissimilar metals can create electric charges within your mouth.
  • Bio-compatibility to dental materials: in the same way some people have adverse reactions to drugs or allergies to foods or other substances, some people react negatively to specific dental materials which can lead to severe allergic reactions and can contribute to a multitude of chronic health problems.
  • TMJ and other alignment problems: TMJ dysfunction may cause misalignment of your teeth, jaws and muscles in your face which can affect your neck, spine, hips and other joints in your body. Similarly, your tongue can simply lie in the wrong position causing a multitude of health issues.  These dysfunctions can be caused by trauma to the body, such as a sports injury or car accident, or they can be caused by dental restorations that do not adequately support a person’s bite.

Traditional dentistry has often taken the approach that the teeth are separate from a person’s overall health, and in fact, people often procrastinate going to the dentist because they feel other health issues may be more pressing. The truth is that your dentist should be a part of your overall health care team. Good dental health and overall health go hand in hand.  Some key prevention measures include:

  • Give your body the proper nutrition it needs to stay healthy and actively protect against oral and overall health problems;
  • Just say no to putting toxins in your body, including sugar, tobacco smoke, fluoride, and mercury and other toxic materials;
  • Maintain proper dental and oral care by brushing, flossing, and caring for your teeth and gums, including regular visits to your dentist.

I encourage you to inform yourself and start looking at dental care as part of an overall health program. I want you to be actively involved in the care you receive and you should demand proper care and treatment. In subsequent posts, I will explain key dental treatments, including the use of non-toxic restorative materials, looking for and removing sources of dental toxins and hidden dental infections, and preventative measures you can take as part of your overall health care routine.